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Vibration has not been scientifically tested for Scoliosis. Many non-surgical programs use vibration in the hopes that it will jostle the spine free of its fixations with no scientific evidence of its effects. Vibration has been shown to increase the stress response which is an undesirable effect in patients who are actively growing or in patients with degeneration and osteroporosis.

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Forced traction of the spine can create instability and may destabilize the spine leading to curvature progression in Scoliosis. There is no evidence that sustained traction has a positive effect but instead can cause pain and may actually be detrimental in the long run.

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Vestibular imbalance in Scoliosis patients is well documented in the scientific literature. Treating the spine without balancing vestibular function can lead to unstable results. Vestibular testing is important to understand what types of supportive treatment can be offered to help improve results.

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Low bone density for age is a known risk factor for progression in the adolescent spine as well as the adult spine for Scoliosis. We routinely evaluate all patients for bone density regardless of age. Furthermore, both hips need to be evaluated in Scoliosis patients due to the known asymmetry of posture which effects the hips individually.

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Bracing alone is not effective enough to manage Scoliosis non-surgically. Even in patients who are treated successfully using orthopedic brace will experience progression throughout life. A comprehensive strategy must be employed which includes retaining movement with exercises. For this reason we utilize the schroth-like exercises we learned during our certification in Bad Sobernheim, Germany. We have modified our program to include contemporary understanding of neuroscience and exercise physiology to improve upon the original schroth method.

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